Rural Violent Crime Reduction Initiative: Diminishing Crime, One Community at a Time

Rural Violent Crime Reduction Initiative: Diminishing Crime, One Community at a Time
Duration: 60 Minutes
Module 1Module 1
Recorded on: 2023-06-22
Unit 1Presentation Materials: Rural Violent Crime Reduction Initiative: Diminishing Crime, One Community at a Time
Unit 2Transcript: Rural Violent Crime Reduction Initiative: Diminishing Crime, One Community at a Time
Unit 3Workbook: Rural Violent Crime Reduction Initiative: Diminishing Crime, One Community at a Time
Unit 4Recording: Rural Violent Crime Reduction Initiative: Diminishing Crime, One Community at a Time

The Rural Violent Crime Reduction Initiative (RVCRI) is a competitive grant and training and technical assistance program aimed at supporting law enforcement and partners in addressing violent crime in rural areas. This session explores RVCRI’s work, the victim-centered approach they take, and how the RVCRI assisted Carbon Valley and Mead Victim Services Program in their objectives.

Leading the discussion are Samantha Rhinerson and Madison Bergman. Sam is the Program Manager at the National Policing Institute where she manages training and technical assistance for the RVCRI. Meanwhile, Madison is the Outreach Victim Advocate for the Carbon Valley and Mead Victim Services Program – one of the RVCRI’s grantees.

Specifics covered in this session include:

  • An overview of the RVCRI: What it is and its goals, the law enforcement segment it specifically caters to, what it provides to grantees, and which types of initiatives grants can be used for.
  • A snapshot of the RVCRI partner agencies and grantees from around the US and the types of initiatives implemented through the grant.
  • What victim assistance is and the concept of victim-centered approach.
  • The three victim-centered approach models available for agencies to employ and their characteristics.
  • A rundown of the benefits of implementing victim services in a rural agency for…
    • The victims who are able to receive more responsive assistance to their needs, timely notification, access to resources, and have increased criminal justice system knowledge.
    • The agency that experiences improvements in terms of effectiveness, community trust, collaboration, information, and case resolution.
    • The community that experiences procedural justice, transparency, improved trust, and an enhanced sense of public safety.
  • Key considerations when implementing victim services in a rural agency in terms of buy-in, understanding state-specific victim rights, strategic planning, the model to employ, hiring personnel and their responsibilities, intersection points with victims, reporting structures, and ethical approaches and professional wellness.
  • The challenges in crime rates and service levels that served as the impetus for the foundation of the Carbon Valley and Mead Victim Services Program.
  • The factors considered during the planning phase in terms of inter-agency agreements and options with other agencies before finally developing the Carbon Valley and Mead Victim Services Program.
  • The program’s implementation steps that took into account:
    • Funding that came from the agencies sharing the resources and the Local Victim Assistance and Law Enforcement (VALE) Fund.
    • Hiring a victim services coordinator initially and later on, the volunteer victim advocates.
    • A policy management model, manual for staff, and procedures that would be used across the agencies.
    • Identifying the resources that the Carbon Valley and Mead Victim Services Program will be tapping to assist victims.
    • In-service training for all departments on the policies, procedures, and the roles, responsibilities, and relationships of those involved.
    • The process of building services and increasing staff by developing the job description, doing the job posting, and hiring.
    • Measuring the progress of the Carbon Valley and Mead Victim Services Program by capturing data related to services provided, individuals served, repeat victimization, etc.

Questions raised by webinar attendees are about:

  • Developing policies and procedures that separate the employees providing victim services from law enforcement.
  • Trends in terms of homicides in rural areas.
  • Using RVCRI grant funds to enable local capacity for forensic examinations.
  • Drivers of increase in IPV in rural areas.
  • On-call compensation.
  • When the grants are available for application.
  • How non-sworn crime and intelligence analysts can support victim services and advocates.
  • The geographical limits to the grants.

 

Other Webinars with this Organization

 

Click here to view and register for other upcoming Police Foundation webinars on the JCH Platform.

 

 

Resources and Handouts

 

Audience Comments

  • “Great presentation on, Rural Violent Crime Reduction Initiative: Diminishing Crime, One Community at a Time.” — Tangie
  • “I thought the session was very informative and the topic was interesting.” — Jessica
  • “Valuable resources and strategies for providing services to victims. Great presentation.” —
  • Seeing that domestic violence has increased has opened my eyes, especially since we’ve been seeing a lot of DV cases at our courthouse — Tia

 

 


 

This webinar is part of the JCH Summer School Program. From June 1-August 31, 2023, attendees will receive a certificate of attendance via email about one hour after the conclusion of a webinar.

Want to join us for other Summer School webinars? Check out our Summer School Calendar and register today!

 

 

About the National Policing Institute: Formerly known as the National Police Foundation, the National Policing Institute’s mission is to pursue excellence in policing through innovation and science. It is the oldest nationally-known, non-profit, non-partisan, and non-membership-driven organization dedicated to improving America’s most noble profession – policing.

The National Policing Institute has been on the cutting edge of police innovation for over 50 years since it was established by the Ford Foundation as a result of the President’s Commission on the Challenge of Crime in a Free Society (1967) and the related conclusions of the Kerner and Eisenhower Commissions, taking place during the same era.

 


 

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